A Writers' journey

follow me as I struggle to make a career as a successful novelist

638 Basic Character Traits

writeoutofmymouth:

This page is sorted into three sections: positive, neutral, and negative traits.

Since they’re all numbered, you can use a random number generator to randomly select a trait or two from each category, and then practice fleshing out a character from those traits.

You can also just reference this for inspiration when developing characters.

(via between-the-shelves)

disneysnowprincess:

frozendailydose:

clicketty:

brandysmellslikechocolate:

theory: the Original Snow Queen was the one who granted (or cursed) Elsa with Ice powers. Queen Mother was lost in a wintry forest for awhile when she chanced on the Snow Queen, who conveniently was also looking for an heir to pass on her powers and become the new Snow Queen.

Partly inspired from the fanfiction 'Born or Cursed'  by TwiddledSpire. I’ve actually had this headcanon/theory for a long time now, and one of my speculation for the Plot of Frozen’s sequel is that there will be an enemy with magical powers of sorts, trying to invade Arendelle. In this case, maybe Elsa can ask the original snow queen for help…or somehting. i dunno, it’s just a nice idea

Snow Queen’s design taken from early Disney Pre-Frozen concept sketches 

HEADCANON ACCEPTED \(•~•)/

oooooh I like thissss

inkteller:

OH MYG GOD THIS IS THE GREATEST THING EVER I DON’T CARE WHO YOU ARE JUST WATCH THE THING

(via ice-solation)

To All Writers of Everything Ever

latenightspooky:

I need to ramble about this:

image

Also known as the best writing program ever! It’s a full-screen writing program!

So you open it up, and it looks like this:

image

You’re thinking, “Ok, so what? It’s a screen with a picture. Whoopdie do.” But it get’s better! It’s…

(Source: beenokle.com)

thewritingcafe:


This is a basic guide. If you want to know every detail about the economy of your world, you’ll have to do extra research for that specific system. These systems will have to be adapted to fit your world, your population, and the resources available to your characters.
An economic system is an exchange of services and goods. This can be on a large scale (within an entire population) or a small scale (within a single family). Therefore, the economic structure of your world is not simply “this will be a market economy”. You have to create the acceptable or expected forms of exchange between individuals. This will add depth to your culture and the way your characters behave.
FORMS OF EXCHANGE


Market: This is when products are measured by money and sold for money, which is then used to purchase other goods. The goal is to gain more money and more goods. Market economies exist on the following:


Market economies are self-regulating.
The majority of the population makes a living by selling goods and services on the market.
All goods and services (private and public) have value.
Factors of production are distributed, dispensed, and allocated by the market.


Read More

thewritingcafe:

This is a basic guide. If you want to know every detail about the economy of your world, you’ll have to do extra research for that specific system. These systems will have to be adapted to fit your world, your population, and the resources available to your characters.

An economic system is an exchange of services and goods. This can be on a large scale (within an entire population) or a small scale (within a single family). Therefore, the economic structure of your world is not simply “this will be a market economy”. You have to create the acceptable or expected forms of exchange between individuals. This will add depth to your culture and the way your characters behave.

FORMS OF EXCHANGE

Market: This is when products are measured by money and sold for money, which is then used to purchase other goods. The goal is to gain more money and more goods. Market economies exist on the following:
  • Market economies are self-regulating.
  • The majority of the population makes a living by selling goods and services on the market.
  • All goods and services (private and public) have value.
  • Factors of production are distributed, dispensed, and allocated by the market.

Read More

sherlock-senpai:

britishstarr:

kkristoff:

cold-never-bothered-me-anyways:

Arabian Little Red Riding Hood with a red hijab

A Japanese Snow White with her coveted pale skin and shiny black hair

Mexican Cinderella with colorful Mexican glass blown slippers

Greek Beauty and the Beast where Beast is a minotaur

Culture-bent fairy tales that keep key canonical characteristics

GIVE ME THESE I M M E D I A T E L Y

I AM SO TEMPTED TO DRAW THIS YOU HAVE NO IDEA

DRAW IT

(via tumbleupondisney)

Psychiatric Wards in History

thewritingcafe:

personalcolor asked you:

(I don’t know if you answered this already or not, so I’ll ask again.) I’m writing a realistic story about the asylums of the last century (something like in American Horror Story). I’m Spanish, so I’m not very familiar with American/English…

fluffyfit:

surimistick:

i was making a lot of mistakes and then my archery instructor said:

“you make mistakes because you’re focusing on the target and not on your actions”

and i was like woah

thanks for giving me the best life advice i’ve ever gotten

guys just think about how applicable this is to EVERYFUCKINGTHING

(via ice-solation)

midenianscholar:

Since my WIP, Illuminate, is also the thesis project for my graduate program, I don’t have as much time as I’m used to for fiddling around and rewriting stuff.

The logical response? Go absolutely crazy.

Step 1: Make Character Arcs for Everyone.

The Interwebs contain lots of great information about character arcs, so in brief: In the course of a story, characters will respond to conflict on an external and internal level, and by the conclusion characters will undergo some sort of change. This creates story arcs.

Every book has at least one major arc. I personally like Doug Tenapel’s advice to split stories into three acts, each with their own arc.

Here’s how I did it.

(keep reading)

(via clevergirlhelps)

Anonymous asked: In a book I'm plotting my protagonist from Earth accidentally stumbles upon a completely different (fantasy) world. I'm afraid this already sounds cliche, how would I go about making this work?Thanks and love the blog.

thewritingcafe:

Stories like these are portal fantasies, making them a subgenre of fantasy. Therefore, the stumbling onto a fantasy world is not a cliche itself, but how it happens can be cliche.

How did they get there?

There are two different ways characters can find worlds through the portal means:

  • Accidental: Examples include Alice in Wonderland, The Chronicles of Narnia, and Stardust. There are tons of ways characters can accidentally stumble upon another world. They might be looking for something else, they might be chasing something, they might fall into something, an experiment might go wrong, they might take a wrong turn…
  • Shown: Examples include Harry Potter and Peter Pan. In this situation, someone else brings your character to this hidden world through the portal. If your character chases this person and ends up in that world (like Alice in Wonderland), I would classify it as accidental. Your character can also be summoned from a person within the fantasy world.

Now you need to come up with the portal. The portal does not have to be an actual portal. The portal in Peter Pan is flying to the second star on the right, straight on ‘til morning. The portal in The Chronicles of Narnia is the wardrobe. In Harry Potter, it’s the two walls (one to Diagon Alley and one to the train). Some portals can be summoned (Halloween Town II).

Portal Cliches:

  • Doors
  • Windows
  • Mirrors
  • Holes in things (bushes, the ground, etc.)

Cliches and Things to Avoid:

  • The character immediately wants to go back home or spends the whole time trying to get back home.
  • The characters in the fantasy world reflect the characters in the real world.
  • The fantasy world is perfect with maybe one or two villains. Eradicating them restores the fantasy world to perfection.
  • Avoid wish fulfillment.
  • The protagonist becomes the savior of this world despite being an outsider who knows next to nothing about that world.

Things I Don’t See Often in Portal Fantasies:

  • Characters from both worlds travel back and forth.
  • People already know about the portal prior to the beginning of the story.
  • People from the fantasy world come into our world*.
  • The portal is regulated and guarded.
  • There is more than one portal.
  • Our world is the fantasy world*.
  • Traveling through the portal has some side effects on the character (long term or short term).

*There is a difference between these two. In the first one, the story would start in our world and the POV character(s) would be in our world. In the second one, the story would start in the fantasy world and the POV character would travel to our world.