A Writers' journey

follow me as I struggle to make a career as a successful novelist
disney-rapunzel-merida-vanellope:

guitartheoctober-relatedsubject:

vsylum:

sarab34r:

screwedjewedandtattooed:

itskirssy:

m0narch:

duilliath:

Joker without makeup .

thats really disrespectful.. he was clearly injured in some sort of way may it be war or what have you, he is probably so depressed his face is scarred like this, he has to wake up everyday seeing this his own face, why would you make fun of him like this? fuck off. 

^

 seriously, anyone who would make fun of this is just fucked up. i actually think he’s still more attractive than like half the guys out there, even with his face like this

 you guys do realize that this literally is the joker without makeup? this is heath ledger in The Dark Knight, in a scene where he’s hiding in a group of policemen.

oh thats awkward

Tune in next time for another episode of I Don’t Think You Actually Watched that Movie.

LMFAO

disney-rapunzel-merida-vanellope:

guitartheoctober-relatedsubject:

vsylum:

sarab34r:

screwedjewedandtattooed:

itskirssy:

m0narch:

duilliath:

Joker without makeup .

thats really disrespectful.. he was clearly injured in some sort of way may it be war or what have you, he is probably so depressed his face is scarred like this, he has to wake up everyday seeing this his own face, why would you make fun of him like this? fuck off. 

^

 seriously, anyone who would make fun of this is just fucked up. i actually think he’s still more attractive than like half the guys out there, even with his face like this

 you guys do realize that this literally is the joker without makeup? this is heath ledger in The Dark Knight, in a scene where he’s hiding in a group of policemen.

oh thats awkward

Tune in next time for another episode of I Don’t Think You Actually Watched that Movie.

LMFAO

(Source: duilliath, via thesageofthyme)

iloveherthatwomanin12b:

Arab Little Red Riding Hood with a red hijab

A Japanese Snow White with her coveted pale skin and shiny black hair

Mexican Cinderella with colorful Mexican glass blown slippers

Greek Beauty and the Beast where Beast is a minotaur

Culture-bent fairy tales that keep key canonical characteristics

(via thesageofthyme)

bigbraingene:

60 Awesome Search Engines for Serious Writers


Finding the information you need as a writer shouldn’t be a chore. Luckily, there are plenty of search engines out there that are designed to help you at any stage of the process, from coming up with great ideas to finding a publisher to get your work into print. Both writers still in college and those on their way to professional success will appreciate this list of useful search applications that are great from making writing a little easier and more efficient.
Professional
Find other writers, publishers and ways to market your work through these searchable databases and search engines.
Litscene: Use this search engine to search through thousands of writers and literary projects, and add your own as well.
Thinkers.net: Get a boost in your creativity with some assistance from this site.
PoeWar: Whether you need help with your career or your writing, this site is full of great searchable articles.
Publisher’s Catalogues: Try out this site to search through the catalogs and names of thousands of publishers.
Edit Red: Through this site you can showcase your own work and search through work by others, as well as find helpful FAQ’s on writing.
Writersdock: Search through this site for help with your writing, find jobs and join other writers in discussions.
PoetrySoup: If you want to find some inspirational poetry, this site is a great resource.
Booksie.com: Here, you can search through a wide range of self-published books.
One Stop Write Shop: Use this tool to search through the writings of hundreds of other amateur writers.
Writer’s Cafe: Check out this online writer’s forum to find and share creative works.
Literary Marketplace: Need to know something about the publishing industry? Use this search tool to find the information you need now.
Writing
These helpful tools will help you along in the writing process.
WriteSearch: This search engine focuses exclusively on sites devoted to reading and writing to deliver its results.
The Burry Man Writers Center: Find a wealth of writing resources on this searchable site.
Writing.com: This fully-featured site makes it possible to find information both fun and serious about the craft of writing.
Purdue OWL: Need a little instruction on your writing? This tool from Purdue University in Lafayette, IN can help.
Writing Forums: Search through these writing forums to find answers to your writing issues.
Research 
Try out these tools to get your writing research done in a snap.
Google Scholar: With this specialized search engine from Google, you’ll only get reliable, academic results for your searches.
WorldCat: If you need a book from the library, try out this tool. It’ll search and find the closest location.
Scirus: Find great scientific articles and publications through this search engine.
OpenLibrary: If you don’t have time to run to a brick-and-mortar library, this online tool can still help you find books you can use.
Online Journals Search Engine: Try out this search engine to find free online journal articles.
All Academic: This search engine focuses on returning highly academic, reliable resources.
LOC Ask a Librarian: Search through the questions on this site to find helpful answers about the holdings at the Library of Congress.
Encylcopedia.com: This search engine can help you find basic encyclopedia articles.
Clusty: If you’re searching for a topic to write on, this search engine with clustered results can help get your creative juices flowing.
Intute: Here you’ll find a British search engine that delivers carefully chosen results from academia.
AllExperts: Have a question? Ask the experts on this site or search through the existing answers.
Reference
Need to look up a quote or a fact? These search tools make it simple.
Writer’s Web Search Engine: This search engine is a great place to find reference information on how to write well.
Bloomsbury Magazine Research Centre: You’ll find numerous resources on publications, authors and more through this search engine.
Merriam-Webster Dictionary and Thesaurus: Make sure you’re using words correctly and can come up with alternatives with the help of this tool.
References.net: Find all the reference material you could ever need through this search engine.
Quotes.net: If you need a quote, try searching for one by topic or by author on this site.
Literary Encyclopedia: Look up any famous book or author in this search tool.
Acronym Finder: Not sure what a particular acronym means? Look it up here.
Bartleby: Through Bartleby, you can find a wide range of quotes from famous thinkers, writers and celebrities.
Wikipedia.com: Just about anything and everything you could want to look up is found on this site.
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Find all the great philosophers you could want to reference in this online tool.
Niche Writers
If you’re focusing on writing in a particular niche, these tools can be a big help.
PubGene: Those working in sci-fi or medical writing will appreciate this database of genes, biological terms and organisms.
GoPubMd: You’ll find all kinds of science and medical search results here.
Jayde: Looking for a business? Try out this search tool.
Zibb: No matter what kind of business you need to find out more about, this tool will find the information.
TechWeb: Do a little tech research using this news site and search engine.
Google Trends: Try out this tool to find out what people are talking about.
Godchecker: Doing a little work on ancient gods and goddesses? This tool can help you make sure you have your information straight.
Healia: Find a wide range of health topics and information by using this site.
Sci-Fi Search: Those working on sci-fi can search through relevant sites to make sure their ideas are original.
Books
Find your own work and inspirational tomes from others by using these search engines.
Literature Classics: This search tool makes it easy to find the free and famous books you want to look through.
InLibris: This search engine provides one of the largest directories of literary resources on the web.
SHARP Web: Using this tool, you can search through the information on the history of reading and publishing.
AllReaders: See what kind of reviews books you admire got with this search engine.
BookFinder: No matter what book you’re looking for you’re bound to find it here.
ReadPrint: Search through this site for access to thousands of free books.
Google Book Search: Search through the content of thousands upon thousands of books here, some of which is free to use.
Indie Store Finder: If you want to support the little guy, this tool makes it simple to find an independent bookseller in your neck of the woods.
Blogging
For web writing, these tools can be a big help.
Technorati: This site makes it possible to search through millions of blogs for both larger topics and individual posts.
Google Blog Search: Using this specialized Google search engine, you can search through the content of blogs all over the web.
Domain Search: Looking for a place to start your own blog? This search tool will let you know what’s out there.
OpinMind: Try out this blog search tool to find opinion focused blogs.
IceRocket: Here you’ll find a real-time blog search engine so you’ll get the latest news and posts out there.
PubSub:  This search tool scours sites like Twitter and Friendfeed to find the topics people are talking about most every day.

bigbraingene:

60 Awesome Search Engines for Serious Writers

Finding the information you need as a writer shouldn’t be a chore. Luckily, there are plenty of search engines out there that are designed to help you at any stage of the process, from coming up with great ideas to finding a publisher to get your work into print. Both writers still in college and those on their way to professional success will appreciate this list of useful search applications that are great from making writing a little easier and more efficient.

Professional

Find other writers, publishers and ways to market your work through these searchable databases and search engines.

  1. Litscene: Use this search engine to search through thousands of writers and literary projects, and add your own as well.
  2. Thinkers.net: Get a boost in your creativity with some assistance from this site.
  3. PoeWar: Whether you need help with your career or your writing, this site is full of great searchable articles.
  4. Publisher’s Catalogues: Try out this site to search through the catalogs and names of thousands of publishers.
  5. Edit Red: Through this site you can showcase your own work and search through work by others, as well as find helpful FAQ’s on writing.
  6. Writersdock: Search through this site for help with your writing, find jobs and join other writers in discussions.
  7. PoetrySoup: If you want to find some inspirational poetry, this site is a great resource.
  8. Booksie.com: Here, you can search through a wide range of self-published books.
  9. One Stop Write Shop: Use this tool to search through the writings of hundreds of other amateur writers.
  10. Writer’s Cafe: Check out this online writer’s forum to find and share creative works.
  11. Literary Marketplace: Need to know something about the publishing industry? Use this search tool to find the information you need now.

Writing

These helpful tools will help you along in the writing process.

  1. WriteSearch: This search engine focuses exclusively on sites devoted to reading and writing to deliver its results.
  2. The Burry Man Writers Center: Find a wealth of writing resources on this searchable site.
  3. Writing.com: This fully-featured site makes it possible to find information both fun and serious about the craft of writing.
  4. Purdue OWL: Need a little instruction on your writing? This tool from Purdue University in Lafayette, IN can help.
  5. Writing Forums: Search through these writing forums to find answers to your writing issues.

Research

Try out these tools to get your writing research done in a snap.

  1. Google Scholar: With this specialized search engine from Google, you’ll only get reliable, academic results for your searches.
  2. WorldCat: If you need a book from the library, try out this tool. It’ll search and find the closest location.
  3. Scirus: Find great scientific articles and publications through this search engine.
  4. OpenLibrary: If you don’t have time to run to a brick-and-mortar library, this online tool can still help you find books you can use.
  5. Online Journals Search Engine: Try out this search engine to find free online journal articles.
  6. All Academic: This search engine focuses on returning highly academic, reliable resources.
  7. LOC Ask a Librarian: Search through the questions on this site to find helpful answers about the holdings at the Library of Congress.
  8. Encylcopedia.com: This search engine can help you find basic encyclopedia articles.
  9. Clusty: If you’re searching for a topic to write on, this search engine with clustered results can help get your creative juices flowing.
  10. Intute: Here you’ll find a British search engine that delivers carefully chosen results from academia.
  11. AllExperts: Have a question? Ask the experts on this site or search through the existing answers.

Reference

Need to look up a quote or a fact? These search tools make it simple.

  1. Writer’s Web Search Engine: This search engine is a great place to find reference information on how to write well.
  2. Bloomsbury Magazine Research Centre: You’ll find numerous resources on publications, authors and more through this search engine.
  3. Merriam-Webster Dictionary and Thesaurus: Make sure you’re using words correctly and can come up with alternatives with the help of this tool.
  4. References.net: Find all the reference material you could ever need through this search engine.
  5. Quotes.net: If you need a quote, try searching for one by topic or by author on this site.
  6. Literary Encyclopedia: Look up any famous book or author in this search tool.
  7. Acronym Finder: Not sure what a particular acronym means? Look it up here.
  8. Bartleby: Through Bartleby, you can find a wide range of quotes from famous thinkers, writers and celebrities.
  9. Wikipedia.com: Just about anything and everything you could want to look up is found on this site.
  10. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Find all the great philosophers you could want to reference in this online tool.

Niche Writers

If you’re focusing on writing in a particular niche, these tools can be a big help.

  1. PubGene: Those working in sci-fi or medical writing will appreciate this database of genes, biological terms and organisms.
  2. GoPubMd: You’ll find all kinds of science and medical search results here.
  3. Jayde: Looking for a business? Try out this search tool.
  4. Zibb: No matter what kind of business you need to find out more about, this tool will find the information.
  5. TechWeb: Do a little tech research using this news site and search engine.
  6. Google Trends: Try out this tool to find out what people are talking about.
  7. Godchecker: Doing a little work on ancient gods and goddesses? This tool can help you make sure you have your information straight.
  8. Healia: Find a wide range of health topics and information by using this site.
  9. Sci-Fi Search: Those working on sci-fi can search through relevant sites to make sure their ideas are original.

Books

Find your own work and inspirational tomes from others by using these search engines.

  1. Literature Classics: This search tool makes it easy to find the free and famous books you want to look through.
  2. InLibris: This search engine provides one of the largest directories of literary resources on the web.
  3. SHARP Web: Using this tool, you can search through the information on the history of reading and publishing.
  4. AllReaders: See what kind of reviews books you admire got with this search engine.
  5. BookFinder: No matter what book you’re looking for you’re bound to find it here.
  6. ReadPrint: Search through this site for access to thousands of free books.
  7. Google Book Search: Search through the content of thousands upon thousands of books here, some of which is free to use.
  8. Indie Store Finder: If you want to support the little guy, this tool makes it simple to find an independent bookseller in your neck of the woods.

Blogging

For web writing, these tools can be a big help.

  1. Technorati: This site makes it possible to search through millions of blogs for both larger topics and individual posts.
  2. Google Blog Search: Using this specialized Google search engine, you can search through the content of blogs all over the web.
  3. Domain Search: Looking for a place to start your own blog? This search tool will let you know what’s out there.
  4. OpinMind: Try out this blog search tool to find opinion focused blogs.
  5. IceRocket: Here you’ll find a real-time blog search engine so you’ll get the latest news and posts out there.
  6. PubSub: This search tool scours sites like Twitter and Friendfeed to find the topics people are talking about most every day.

(via thewritershelpers)

123 Ideas for Character Flaws

stannisbaratheon:

amandaonwriting:

Character Flaws

  1. Absent-minded - Preoccupied to the extent of being unaware of one’s immediate surroundings. Abstracted, daydreaming, inattentive, oblivious, forgetful.
  2. Abusive - Characterized by improper infliction of physical or psychological…
Idina Menzel

—Let It Go

disneysnowprincess:

sermisty:

hugfactory:

elsanna-fanboy:

ultra-taderdot93:

loveable-elsanna:

3d-audio:

3D audio of Let It Go By Idina Menzel

What is 3D sound?

3D audio effects are a group of sound effects that manipulate the sound produced by stereo speakers, surround-sound speakers, speaker-arrays, or headphones. This frequently involves the virtual placement of sound sources anywhere in three-dimensional space, including behind, above or below the listener.

Only works with headphones/earphones

WHAT IN THE FUCK IS THIS DEMON MAGIC

image

I NEED FUCKING HEADPHONES

WHAT THE FUCK

WHY DOES THE WORLD HATE ME

I DONT HAVE HEADPHONES WHEN I NEED IT MOST 

THIS

I JUST

*dies*

OMG

OH MY GOD. I CANT. OMG.

if you consider a woman
less pure after you’ve touched her
maybe you should take a look at your hands

(via solacity)

I will never not reblog this

(via nuedvixx)

(Source: anachronica, via cringing)

maxkirin:

Joss Whedon’s Top 10 Writing Tips (Source)

1. FINISH IT

Actually finishing it is what I’m gonna put in as step one. You may laugh at this, but it’s true. I have so many friends who have written two-thirds of a screenplay, and then re-written it for about three years. Finishing a screenplay is first of all truly difficult, and secondly really liberating. Even if it’s not perfect, even if you know you’re gonna have to go back into it, type to the end. You have to have a little closure.

2. STRUCTURE

Structure means knowing where you’re going ; making sure you don’t meander about. Some great films have been made by meandering people, like Terrence Malick and Robert Altman, but it’s not as well done today and I don’t recommend it. I’m a structure nut. I actually make charts. Where are the jokes ? The thrills ? The romance ? Who knows what, and when ? You need these things to happen at the right times, and that’s what you build your structure around : the way you want your audience to feel. Charts, graphs, coloured pens, anything that means you don’t go in blind is useful.

3. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY

This really should be number one. Even if you’re writing a Die Hard rip-off, have something to say about Die Hard rip-offs. The number of movies that are not about what they purport to be about is staggering. It’s rare, especially in genres, to find a movie with an idea and not just, ‘This’ll lead to many fine set-pieces’. The Island evolves into a car-chase movie, and the moments of joy are when they have clone moments and you say, ‘What does it feel like to be those guys ?’

4. EVERYBODY HAS A REASON TO LIVE

Everybody has a perspective. Everybody in your scene, including the thug flanking your bad guy, has a reason. They have their own voice, their own identity, their own history. If anyone speaks in such a way that they’re just setting up the next person’s lines, then you don’t get dialogue : you get soundbites. Not everybody has to be funny ; not everybody has to be cute ; not everybody has to be delightful, and not everybody has to speak, but if you don’t know who everybody is and why they’re there, why they’re feeling what they’re feeling and why they’re doing what they’re doing, then you’re in trouble.

5. CUT WHAT YOU LOVE

Here’s one trick that I learned early on. If something isn’t working, if you have a story that you’ve built and it’s blocked and you can’t figure it out, take your favourite scene, or your very best idea or set-piece, and cut it. It’s brutal, but sometimes inevitable. That thing may find its way back in, but cutting it is usually an enormously freeing exercise.

6. LISTEN

When I’ve been hired as a script doctor, it’s usually because someone else can’t get it through to the next level. It’s true that writers are replaced when executives don’t know what else to do, and that’s terrible, but the fact of the matter is that for most of the screenplays I’ve worked on, I’ve been needed, whether or not I’ve been allowed to do anything good. Often someone’s just got locked, they’ve ossified, they’re so stuck in their heads that they can’t see the people around them. It’s very important to know when to stick to your guns, but it’s also very important to listen to absolutely everybody. The stupidest person in the room might have the best idea.

7. TRACK THE AUDIENCE MOOD

You have one goal : to connect with your audience. Therefore, you must track what your audience is feeling at all times. One of the biggest problems I face when watching other people’s movies is I’ll say, ‘This part confuses me’, or whatever, and they’ll say, ‘What I’m intending to say is this’, and they’ll go on about their intentions. None of this has anything to do with my experience as an audience member. Think in terms of what audiences think. They go to the theatre, and they either notice that their butts are numb, or they don’t. If you’re doing your job right, they don’t. People think of studio test screenings as terrible, and that’s because a lot of studios are pretty stupid about it. They panic and re-shoot, or they go, ‘Gee, Brazil can’t have an unhappy ending,’ and that’s the horror story. But it can make a lot of sense.

8. WRITE LIKE A MOVIE

Write the movie as much as you can. If something is lush and extensive, you can describe it glowingly ; if something isn’t that important, just get past it tersely. Let the read feel like the movie ; it does a lot of the work for you, for the director, and for the executives who go, ‘What will this be like when we put it on its feet ?’

9. DON’T LISTEN

Having given the advice about listening, I have to give the opposite advice, because ultimately the best work comes when somebody’s fucked the system ; done the unexpected and let their own personal voice into the machine that is moviemaking. Choose your battles. You wouldn’t get Paul Thomas Anderson, or Wes Anderson, or any of these guys if all moviemaking was completely cookie-cutter. But the process drives you in that direction ; it’s a homogenizing process, and you have to fight that a bit. There was a point while we were making Firefly when I asked the network not to pick it up : they’d started talking about a different show.

10. DON’T SELL OUT

The first penny I ever earned, I saved. Then I made sure that I never had to take a job just because I needed to. I still needed jobs of course, but I was able to take ones that I loved. When I say that includes Waterworld, people scratch their heads, but it’s a wonderful idea for a movie. Anything can be good. Even Last Action Hero could’ve been good. There’s an idea somewhere in almost any movie : if you can find something that you love, then you can do it. If you can’t, it doesn’t matter how skillful you are : that’s called whoring.”

Want more writerly content? Follow maxkirin.tumblr.com!

(via mckeegles)

hollandmartinn:

r0ki:

thatrockerdude:

chabothedino:

cryforce:

thewriterkid:

Fun things to say when someone tells you they’re going to go to the bathroom:

  • Stay safe
  • Congratulations
  • That’s what they all say
  • Different strokes for different folks
  • I hope you have the time of your life
  • But you have so much to live for
  • Please explain
  • think of me
  • Don’t fall in
  • I’ll alert the media
  • Good luck
  • Have fun
  • Mention my name and you’ll get a good seat

(via chase-the-wind)

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

tamorapierce:

memily:

adorabelledearheart:


thepliablefoe:


Norwegian forest cats are the best.
They look like little snow lions.


MORE REASONS WHY NORWEGIAN FOREST CATS ARE THE BEST:
The colloquial term for them is “skogkatten”.
They’re also called “fairy cats” in Norway, because they’re so pretty.
They run down trees headfirst.
They’re fricking gigantic and they purr really loud.
They literally walk over snow like motherloving Legolas.
In Norse mythology, skogkatts pull the goddess Freya’s carriage.
Who doesn’t want a carriage pulled by cats?
Viking cats. End of story.


Oh what a terrible thing it appears that I haven’t reblogged these glorious beasts this year yet

We have come to pronounce judgment upon those who do not respect the will of the Catmoot.

I need a whole basket of these magical Norse cats :D

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

tamorapierce:

memily:

adorabelledearheart:

thepliablefoe:

Norwegian forest cats are the best.

They look like little snow lions.

MORE REASONS WHY NORWEGIAN FOREST CATS ARE THE BEST:

The colloquial term for them is “skogkatten”.

They’re also called “fairy cats” in Norway, because they’re so pretty.

They run down trees headfirst.

They’re fricking gigantic and they purr really loud.

They literally walk over snow like motherloving Legolas.

In Norse mythology, skogkatts pull the goddess Freya’s carriage.

Who doesn’t want a carriage pulled by cats?

Viking cats. End of story.

Oh what a terrible thing it appears that I haven’t reblogged these glorious beasts this year yet

We have come to pronounce judgment upon those who do not respect the will of the Catmoot.

I need a whole basket of these magical Norse cats :D

(Source: attack-on-precal, via chase-the-wind)